SOUPHOLE

"You've just killed a moose. Hungry, you've a hankering for nothing quite as much as some hot soup, flavored perhaps with wild leeks whose flat leaves you see wavering nearby. Why not take the sharp end of a dead limb and scoop a small hole in the ground? Why not line this concavity with a chunk of fresh hide? Then after adding the water and other ingredients, why not let a few hot clean stones do your cooking while you finish dressing out the animal?"

Farlow Farlite 12’ 7/8 Fiberglass spey rod.

(Source: vimeo.com)

All Fishermen Are Liars

Words of wisdom from the Master Bum.

(Source: vimeo.com)

flytyingarchive:

Black & Orange GP Intruder

Here’s something new for myself. I haven’t tied many intruders but it’s a style I have been wanting to try out for a long time. I like the sparse mobile action many of these flies have and think there’s plenty of room for experiment and innovation. They are also fairly simple to tie and this one is no exception even though it has many steps in it. You could do it a lot simpler with only a little difference to the end result but I enjoyed adding subtle touches to the pattern.

I’m a big fan of Esmond Drury’s General Practitioner salmon fly and especially the version made famous here in Finland by Miki Äikäs which you can find on his site. There’s also a youtube link to a video where Miki ties one of his GP’s. This fly is sort of a tribute to the original but I wanted to tie a fairly dark version of it with only a subtle hint of orange in the key areas. Another big inspiration for this fly is one GP variant I got from Mikael Lindström that has an ever darker color scheme than mine. It’s a beautiful fly and I’m happy to have it in my collection.

Feel free to experiment with this concept and let me know if it hooks you some fish.

Shank: Waddington 45mm
Dubbing: Salar Synthetic Series midnight black and orange in flames, mixed. First a ball of dubbing to lift the hackle and then two equal body sections brushed out well.
Rib: Oval silver tinsel.
Hacles: Ringneck Pheasant rump feathers dyed black and natural brown Pond Heron feathers dyed orange. Three hackles, first in the back then middle and in the front.
Back: Ringneck Pheasant rump feathers dyed black over each hackle. Largest on the back and two feathers in front instead of one. Thin bunch of Black Bear tied in the middle joint before the eyes and back.
Eyes: Golden Pheasant tippet dyed hot orange. Tip cut off to make V-shape and then the feather is lacquered to keep the sides separated. Tied in the middle of the body below the middle pheasant feather.

patagoniaflyfish:

McGee Creek

One of the things I love most about video is having the ability to speed or slow down those happenings around you that otherwise go unnoticed or get lost in the excitement of it all. This little vid does a great job of capturing some of those moments through time-lapse, and some great tunes too!

original content Waist Deep Media

The late Harry Lemire.
Excerpt taken from:
Wild Steelhead The Lure And Lore Of A Pacific Nothwest Icon by
Sean M Gallagher
via Swing The Fly.

The late Harry Lemire.

Excerpt taken from:

Wild Steelhead The Lure And Lore Of A Pacific Nothwest Icon by

Sean M Gallagher

via Swing The Fly.

patagoniaflyfish:

Where the Wild Fish Live

One of my favorite little corners of the world — it’s closer than you might think — the Pitt River in British Columbia is a beautiful destination for some chrome bright steelhead and huge bull trout!

original content Nick Didlick

The editors of newspapers, the popular clergy, politicians and orators of the day and office-holders, though they may be thought to be of very different politics and religion, are essentially one and homogeneous, inasmuch as they are only the various ingredients of the froth which ever floats on the surface of society.

Henry David Thoreau via

http://michaelgracie.com/.

davidbuckleyborden:

 
Distress Map: Watershed Down
Mixed Media, 48 X 68”, 2013
David Buckley Borden
 
THE MAP CODE, Title 36, U.S.C., Chapter 11:
176. Respect for map: No disrespect should be shown to the map of the United States of America.  The map should never be displayed with the Great Lakes down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.*
 



*According to  the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, twenty-one percent of the United States’ river and stream length was in good biological condition, down from 27 percent in 2004, according to the survey, carried out in 2008 and 2009 at almost 2,000 sites.  High levels of phosphorus and nitrogen, runoff from urban areas, shrinking ground cover and pollution from mercury and bacteria were putting the 1.2 million miles (1.9 million km) of streams and rivers surveyed under stress, the EPA said.

davidbuckleyborden:

 

Distress Map: Watershed Down

Mixed Media, 48 X 68”, 2013

David Buckley Borden

 

THE MAP CODE, Title 36, U.S.C., Chapter 11:

176. Respect for map: No disrespect should be shown to the map of the United States of America.  The map should never be displayed with the Great Lakes down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.*

 

*According to  the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, twenty-one percent of the United States’ river and stream length was in good biological condition, down from 27 percent in 2004, according to the survey, carried out in 2008 and 2009 at almost 2,000 sites.  High levels of phosphorus and nitrogen, runoff from urban areas, shrinking ground cover and pollution from mercury and bacteria were putting the 1.2 million miles (1.9 million km) of streams and rivers surveyed under stress, the EPA said.

(via fuckyeahcartography)

October Caddis v. 4Runner

October Caddis v. 4Runner

Shrimp Shack.

Shrimp Shack.